Category Archives: history

The Legacy of the Tevatron by S.D. Holmes and V.D. Shiltsev

In Chris Quigg’s Twitter feed I discovered this gem: The Legacy of the Tevatron in the Area of Accelerator Science by Stephen D. Holmes and Vladimir D. Shiltsev. I was a post-doctoral researcher at Fermilab between August 1988-November 1992. During … Continue reading

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Nobel Prizes for Accelerator/Beam Physics

In the field of accelerator/beam physics and technology there have been many epoch-making innovations but unfortunately only very few of those were recognized with a Nobel Prize. When I go through the list of Nobel laureates I see only these physicists … Continue reading

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L.V. Lorenz and H.A. Lorentz

J.D. Jackson passed away on May 20, 2016. His book “Classical Electrodynamics” is a classic textbook. Like all physicists of my generation I have spent hundreds of hours studying classical electrodynamics from his book. The paper by J.D. Jackson and L.B. … Continue reading

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Edward Witten’s 2014 Kyoto Prize commemorative lecture

Edward Witten has been one of the most respected physicists in the world for the last four decades. His contributions to physics and mathematics have been recognized by many awards and prizes. Edward Witten’s Kyoto Prize commemorative lecture is an important document. The … Continue reading

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FERMILAB History and Archives Project

All universities and national laboratories should maintain historical archives. The Fermilab History and Archives Project is exemplary. You can start with “A Brief History of Fermilab” and continue with “Significant Staff” and then explore the entire website. When I was at Fermilab between … Continue reading

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Helen Thom Edwards

Helen T. Edwards passed away on June 21, 2016 at the age of 80. She was one of the most successful and influential female physicists of the 20’th century. She dedicated her life to the advancement of accelerator and beam … Continue reading

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Interesting karma between Einstein and Bohr

I had a new year’s resolution never to mention Einstein in my posts again. Never say never again! I have a new resolution. I will mention his name as part of physics exposition but I will no longer comment on … Continue reading

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Centennial Anniversary of Einstein’s General Relativity Theory

100 years a ago on November 25 1915 Albert Einstein presented the final version of his theory of gravitation known as the General Relativity to Prussian Academy of Sciences. The paper was published in 1916. Why do we mention David Hilbert in the … Continue reading

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1995: The Revolutionary Year in Technology

in April 1995 the NSFNET was retired and the United States Government no longer funded internet with public money. In 1995 Microsoft released Windows 95. The programming language Java was introduced in 1995 as well. This was a significant event in … Continue reading

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Detailed history of Feynman Diagrams

I have been reading and thinking about the self-interaction problem of elementary particles. Feynman’s name comes up often in my readings. I may say few words about the self-interaction problem in the near future but today I wanted to bring to your … Continue reading

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The person who organized the Solvay conferences

I have 2 posts showing the famous photo from the fifth Solvay Conference in 1927. This photograph is very dear to my heart. I am sure many other physicists feel the same way. Fifth Solvay Conference on Physics (1927) Color Photo … Continue reading

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Niels Bohr’s fascination with Yin and Yang

Niels Bohr (1885-1962) was one of the greatest physicists of the 20’th century. I cannot adequately describe his contributions to physics in a short post. I recommend the Niels Bohr article at the http://www.informationphilosophers.com site. The SEP article titled “Copenhagen … Continue reading

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Fifth Solvay Conference on Physics (1927) Color Photo

Image credit Click on the image to see the bigger version First Row I. Langmuir M. Planck (1918 Nobel Laureate in Physics) Marie Curie (1903 Nobel Laureate in Physics, 1911 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry) H.A. Lorentz (1902 Nobel Laureate in Physics) A. Einstein (1921 Nobel … Continue reading

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There is a difference between knowing what is true and knowing why it is true

“There is a difference between knowing what is true and knowing why it is true” – Edward Witten I found this quotation in the “Conversation with Edward Witten.” I thank Peter Woit for bringing this document to our attention. The … Continue reading

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English translation of Einstein’s original paper on general relativity

The English translation of Einstein’s 1915 paper on general relativity (courtesy of Princeton University Press) http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu/vol6-trans/129 Princeton University Press, working with The Einstein Papers Project hosted at Caltech, has made freely available online more than 5000 documents from Einstein’s first 44 years. … Continue reading

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English translation of Einstein’s original paper on special relativity

The English translation of Einstein’s 1905 paper on special relativity (courtesy of Princeton University Press) http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu/vol2-trans/154 Princeton University Press, working with The Einstein Papers Project hosted at Caltech, has made freely available online more than 5000 documents from Einstein’s first 44 years … Continue reading

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Al-Biruni

image credit I feel so ashamed for not knowing much about al-Biruni – the polymath who lived in the 11’th century. His name was brought to my attention by a newspaper article announcing the establishment of a new private university … Continue reading

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Are Brains Analogue or Digital?

Bartlesville High School formerly known as College High School Brain science is like particle physics. Progress in particle physics has been very slow because the experiments are very expensive and the technology is very difficult. It takes decades to design … Continue reading

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Reading Sohail Inayatullah (2)

This is the second installment in my “Reading Inayatullah” series where I review selected parts of Sohail Inayatullah’s masterpiece “Understanding Sarkar: The Indian Episteme Macrohistory and Transformative Knowledge.” The first one was: Reading Sohail Inayatullah (1) In this installment I … Continue reading

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Reading Sohail Inayatullah (1)

I was fascinated by Sohail Inayatullah’s intellectual tour-de-force “Understanding Sarkar: The Indian Episteme Macrohistory and Transformative Knowledge.” “Understanding Sarkar” is written in the academic style. The author is very careful about maintaining an emotional distance to the subject (P.R.Sarkar and his teachings) … Continue reading

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Einstein did not have any PhD students

There is a great tradition in academia. If you are a successful academic you are supposed to have PhD students and guide them in their dissertation research. The more PhD students you have the better. It is a great responsibility … Continue reading

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Piet Hut the Hero Physicist

This is the first installment of a 3 part series. This post was followed by “Hut-Alford-Tegmark Debate on Math, Matter and Mind” and “My Response to Hut-Alford-Tegmark.” This is also the 3rd installment of  “the physicist” series. The first two … Continue reading

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Skipping an Age

Image credit In my native language Turkish there is a phrase “çağ atlamak” which literally means “skipping an age” but it actually expresses a desire for rapid progress. This phrase has been on my mind lately. In school they taught … Continue reading

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Miletus, Constantinople, Istanbul, New York

Most of my friends don’t know that I write. My family members know about my blog, of course, but they don’t read my writings. I am so thankful that I have few readers who are curious about the things I … Continue reading

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Einstein and Gödel

When I was younger I was deeply impressed by Douglas R. Hofstadter’s book “Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid.” The “Gödel” in the title of that book refers to Kurt Gödel who was one of the greatest mathematicians of … Continue reading

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Einstein at Oxford

When I visited Oxford for the first time I was awe-struck by the serene beauty of the Christ Church College. There are many famous names associated with the Christ Church College at Oxford and Einstein is one of them. It … Continue reading

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On the late adoption of the printing press in the Ottoman Empire

The printing press with movable type was invented by Johannes Gutenberg in Mainz, Germany circa 1439. Ottomans were first introduced to the printing press by the Sephardic Jews in Istanbul in 1494. Ottoman Empire granted protection to Sephardic Jews who … Continue reading

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Electronic Edition of the Works of P.R.Sarkar (Shrii Shrii Anandamurti)

Prabhat Ranjan Sarkar (May 21, 1921 – October 21, 1990), also known by his spiritual name Shrii Shrii Anandamurti was one of the highest expressions of Universal Teacher in human history. He was the founder of Ananda Marga. He was … Continue reading

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Black Sea Deluge

I was born in a small town by the Black Sea. It was a coal mining town. There were breath-taking views from the plateau on top of the hills where every one lived. Nobody lived at the sea level. The … Continue reading

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Pyramid Theories

This is a re-post from the Knol archives. As I shift gears and get ready to write on Neohumanism I thought I should move some of the more eccentric items from my Knol archive to this blog before I move … Continue reading

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The seven mysteries of life according to Guy Murchie

Guy Murchie (1907-1997) wrote an inspiring book titled The Seven Mysteries of Life [1]. He completed this book in 17 years. It is one of my favorite books. I return to it periodically for inspiration. He was a school teacher, … Continue reading

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Ananda Purnima 2013

Shrii Shrii Anandamurti was born on May 21 in 1921 on the day of the full moon. We celebrate his birthday on the day of the full moon in May every year. This happy day is known as Ananda Purnima. … Continue reading

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Mikolaj Kopernik

Today, I was on jury duty. At the entrance of the courthouse, right next to the x-ray machines there was a large commemorative plaque about Copernicus. I don’t know why it was there but I was very happy to see … Continue reading

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J.D. Salinger and Swami Vivekananda

Today, I was reading the news about L.A. Lauder’s 1 billion dollar gift to the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art in the form of an art collection. Buried in the news article was a tidbit of information that another … Continue reading

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The Samurai Astronomer and the Time Difference

On my way to California I watched a movie on the plane: “Tenchi: The Samurai Astronomer.” The film was released in 2012.  The IMDB description is “A chronicle of the life of Yasui Santetsu, a 17th century master of Go … Continue reading

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Albert Einstein and Rabindranath Tagore

The philosopher physicist and the poet philosopher in 1930: their eyes speak volumes, certainly much more than the words they exchanged. Rabindranath Tagore received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913. He was the first Asian Nobel Laurate. Albert Einstein … Continue reading

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Zero

Symbols for zero appeared in many cultures Before Common Era (BCE). The philosophical conception of zero, however, is usually attributed to the Indian philosophy. The evidence is in the Sanskrit language. The Sanskrit word “shunya” meaning “emptiness” or “void” was … Continue reading

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Random Comments on the Turkish Language

My native language is Turkish. I grew up in northern Turkey. I started learning English in high school but it was already too late. The language processing part of my brain was already formed according to Turkish syntax. In 1981 … Continue reading

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Klaus Kommoss

Klaus Kommoss passed away on August 3, 2012. I received the sad news on September 17, 2012. I have never met him but I considered him a friend and a mentor. There are people in my spiritual life that I … Continue reading

Posted in history, spiritual practice, spirituality

The Enlightenment Pope: Benedict XIV (Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini)

I am not Catholic. Why do I make a blog entry about a pope who died 254 years ago? Pope Benedict XIV (Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini) deserves our attention for many reasons but there is one special reason. As soon as … Continue reading

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Mathematician who coined the term mind-stuff

William Kingdon Clifford was a British mathematician and philosopher. In his short life he produced very important and far reaching mathematical and philosophical works. I will let you read the encyclopedia articles and the original books listed below for details. … Continue reading

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Essays by Suresh Emre

A new synthesis of Spiritual Philosophy is presented in Definitions and Summary of Soul Monism I volunteer for the Renaissance Universal (RU) movement. A Vision for a Universal Renaissance. The complete list of my articles is given in https://sureshemre.wordpress.com/index/  

Posted in archetypes, books, collection, Edge series, geometry, geophysics, history, inspiring metaphors, Intuitional Science, list, literature, mathematics, metaphysics, mythology, philosophy, physics, poetry, prediction, science, society, spiritual philosophy, spiritual practice, spirituality, sufism, tutorial, yoga

Supercollider – a failed dream

After ten years of planning and spending $2 billion in construction costs, US Congress canceled the dream project Supercollider for particle physics in 1993. Cynics often say that the role of the government is to transfer money from public to … Continue reading

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Anaximander of Miletus

Anaximander (ca.610 BC – ca.546 BC) was a philosopher who lived in Miletus, a city of Ionia in Asia Minor (Anatolia). He was a student of Thales. He succeeded Thales and became the teacher of Anaximenes and Pythagoras. He made … Continue reading

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Thales of Miletus

Thales of Miletus (ca.624 BC – ca.546 BC), was a philosopher from Miletus in Asia Minor (Anatolia). Physicists consider him as the first physicist in history. His writings did not survive. The major source for Thales’ philosophy and science is Aristotle. … Continue reading

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Phusis, Physics, and Dharma

Etymological origin of the word physics is the Greek word phusis. The first usage of phusis can be traced back to Heraclitus who used it in his aphorism “what is born tends to disappear.” When this aphorism was cited in … Continue reading

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Nobel Laureates in Physics

The Nobel Prize in Physics In 1901 the very first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Wilhelm Röntgen for his discovery of X-rays. In more recent years, the Physics Nobel Prize has been awarded for both pioneering discoveries and … Continue reading

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Fifth Solvay Conference on Physics (1927)

You can view a bigger and colorized version of this photograph here First Row I. Langmuir M. Planck (1918 Nobel Laureate in Physics) Marie Curie (1903 Nobel Laureate in Physics, 1911 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry) H.A. Lorentz (1902 Nobel Laureate in Physics) A. … Continue reading

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Historical Tehuti

Tehuti also known as Thoth was a great personality in ancient Egypt. Tehuti was deified by ancient Egyptians and he was accepted and respected by all societies in the Near East. He is mentioned as the source of knowledge and … Continue reading

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Einstein’s Last Equation

Einstein died at the age of 76 from stomach aneurysm in 1955. He kept working until few hours before his death. At his bed side there were 12 pages of equations. The final line of the last page is the … Continue reading

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Einstein’s 1921 Nobel Prize in 1922 and the Ceremony He Did Not Attend

Einstein could have received 2 Nobel prizes. One for the photoelectric effect and another for the theory of relativity. Einstein was first nominated for the Nobel Prize in 1910 by the chemistry laureate Wilhelm Ostwald. In the next 10 years, … Continue reading

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Crimson Dawn of a Different Kind

Powerful explosions in the aftermath of the Japan earthquake reminded me the big one that happened in Istanbul 32 years ago. The year was 1979. I was a junior at the Bogazici University in Istanbul. An apocalyptic explosion woke me … Continue reading

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Salonika, you are on my mind

My paternal grandparents were forced to immigrate to Turkey from a village near Salonika. This happened in 1923 as part of the “mübadele”  (population exchange between Greece and Turkey). They were traumatized by this experience all their lives. When they … Continue reading

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The Renaissance Problem

Renaissance is dear to my heart. I volunteer for the Renaissance Universal movement and I often think about the significance of the European Renaissance. Renaissance means rebirth in French. It is often stated that the European Renaissance started in Florence, … Continue reading

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Spiritual Undercurrents of Anatolia

Turkish (Anatolian) society is going through a tumultuous transformation. On the surface, it seems as though the society is becoming more dogmatic. Sunni Islam is taking over all state institutions. It would not be an exaggeration to say that Mustafa … Continue reading

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