Author Archives: Suresh Emre

Reality+ (new book by David J. Chalmers)

David J. Chalmers is my favorite philosopher. I have been following his work since 1994. He is known for his contributions to the academic studies of consciousness. For many years he was focused on the question: “What is consciousness?” In … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy | Tagged , | Comments Off on Reality+ (new book by David J. Chalmers)

Closure Problem of Emergence

Abstract: Aristotle stated that the whole is more than the sum of its parts. Modern scientists came to the same conclusion. Phillip W. Anderson wrote an influential article titled “More is Different” in 1972 [1]. Many other scientists joined him in … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Closure Problem of Emergence

Learning to trust our intuition

Development of new ideas starts with learning to trust our intuition. Then comes the hard part of working out the details. Presentation is a big job too. After the presentation, the probability of being ignored by professional scientists is very … Continue reading

Posted in inspiration | Comments Off on Learning to trust our intuition

Excitement about the new value of the W boson mass

Tevatron was the highest energy accelerator in the world for 25 years between 1986-2011 colliding protons and antiprotons at the center-of-mass energy of 1.8 Tev. CDF was one of the two detectors (D0 being the other one) performing measurements using … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Excitement about the new value of the W boson mass

CLA (circle, line, angle) symbolism

Circle is a symbol of confinement. Dimensionless point symbolizes freedom. Straight line is a symbol of the escape from confinement. Straight line cannot symbolize freedom because line is a form. All forms are bounded therefore not free. Circle is a … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics | Tagged , | Comments Off on CLA (circle, line, angle) symbolism

First sentence of a book

Authors sometimes spend years to decide about the first sentence of their book. Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk is famous for his opening lines. This is the most famous one: “I read a book one day and my whole life was … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on First sentence of a book

Truth

IEP article on “Truth”: https://iep.utm.edu/truth/ SEP article on “Truth”: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/truth/ Wikipedia article on “Truth”: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth Dictionary “Truth”: https://www.thefreedictionary.com/truth

Posted in philosophy | Tagged , | Comments Off on Truth

Zero mass but non-zero weight

Photons have zero rest mass but non-zero weight. There is a tutorial paper on this by M.B. van der Mark and G.W. ‘t Hooft titled “Light is heavy“. Physicists do not use the term “rest mass” anymore. More appropriate term … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Zero mass but non-zero weight

Is it possible for the brain to use backpropagation?

This is a follow-up on my earlier post titled “No useful theory of biological neural computation yet“. A recent Quanta article titled “Artificial Neural Nets Finally Yield Clues to How Brains Learn” by Anil Ananthaswamy gives me hope that Neuroscientists … Continue reading

Posted in brain | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Is it possible for the brain to use backpropagation?

Grand idea of Semantic Web is dying

It looks like the grand idea of Semantic Web is dying. That would be a shame! This article ( Whatever happened to the Semantic Web? ) summarizes the state of the Semantic Web project as of 2018. The official FAQ … Continue reading

Posted in computer science | Tagged , | Comments Off on Grand idea of Semantic Web is dying

The Mysterious Google PageRank Algorithm

Even though there are many clues about the factors used by the Google PageRank algorithm it remains mysterious. They will never tell us exactly how it works to prevent manipulation. Besides, they calibrate their algorithm continuously based on experiments. Citations … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Comments Off on The Mysterious Google PageRank Algorithm

A Lecture on Falsafa by Nicholas Heer

There is an informative article titled “A Lecture on Islamic Philosophy” written by Nicholas Heer. Let me remind you that the “Islamic Philosophy” here refers to the intellectual tradition known as falsafa which is distinct from “Islamic Theology”. Falsafa is distinct … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy | Tagged | Comments Off on A Lecture on Falsafa by Nicholas Heer

Artificial Associative Memory

The classic book on artificial associative memory is T. Kohonen’s “Self-Organization and Associative Memory” [1]. Kohonen’s most famous contribution is the Self-Organizing Map. Prof. Kohonen recently passed away on December 13, 2021, at the age of 87. There is also a … Continue reading

Posted in computer science | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Artificial Associative Memory

Open access to Turkish academic journals

English: https://dergipark.org.tr/en/ Turkish: https://dergipark.org.tr/tr/ DergiPark provides open access to articles published in Turkish academic journals. DergiPark is the national journal management and publication system of Turkey. Only open access journals are hosted by DergiPark. A significant portion of the articles … Continue reading

Posted in society | Tagged | Comments Off on Open access to Turkish academic journals

Symmetry Magazine’s “Quantum Ecosystem” articles

The Symmetry Online Magazine published a series of articles to educate public about quantum computing. Playing by the quantum rules The second quantum revolution From bits to qubits What is quantum information? More than one way to make a qubit … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Symmetry Magazine’s “Quantum Ecosystem” articles

Latest on proton and antiproton charge-to-mass ratio

Latest results from the BASE experiment at CERN published in Nature [1] shows that the charge-to-mass ratios of protons and antiprotons are the same to a precision of 16 parts per trillion. This is a new record in precision. (charge_proton/mass_proton) … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Latest on proton and antiproton charge-to-mass ratio

Citation statistics in scientific categories

This is a follow-up on my 2014 blogpost titled “Average citations per article in different disciplines” which showed this figure: These numbers are averages over many papers and many years. Some papers get thousands of citations and others get no … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged | Comments Off on Citation statistics in scientific categories

Live status of JWST

I watched the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with great excitement this morning. You can follow the mission status of JWST from this page: https://webb.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/whereIsWebb.html News: https://webbtelescope.org/news Home: https://webbtelescope.org/

Posted in astronomy | Tagged , | Comments Off on Live status of JWST

Different kinds of distance

Image credit for formulas: Maarten Grootendorst [2] Euclidean distance Distance between two series. Manhattan distance Distance between two series. Chebyshev distance Distance between two series. Chebyshev distance has limited applicability. Minkowski distance This is the general formula that covers Euclidean, … Continue reading

Posted in machine learning, science | Tagged , | Comments Off on Different kinds of distance

Different kinds of entropy

More than ten years ago, I have written a blogpost titled “Confusion about Entropy” and brought readers’ attention to the fact that even scientists are confused about entropy. That’s because there are different kinds of entropy: 1) entropy as dispersal … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Different kinds of entropy

Unification themes in physics

Most physicists believe that the universe is governed by comprehensible laws. They dedicate their lives to the discovery of those laws. A majority of them believe that the laws are part of a single theoretical framework. This belief system and … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, science | Tagged , | Comments Off on Unification themes in physics

Neutrino resources

Read this first Scientific Background on the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 Fermilab All things neutrino Neutrinos (Fermilab experiments) T2K The FAQ page at T2K Matt Strassler Neutrino Types and Neutrino Oscillations How to make neutrino beam How to detect … Continue reading

Posted in physics, tutorial | Tagged | Comments Off on Neutrino resources

David Mumford’s thoughts on consciousness

I have been reading David Mumford’s blog recently. David Mumford received a Fields Medal (Nobel Prize of Mathematics) for his work on algebraic geometry. He received many other awards including the National Medal of Science in 2010. He writes about … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy | Tagged , , | Comments Off on David Mumford’s thoughts on consciousness

Three kinds of neutrinos – no more, no less

I never understood the search for sterile (right-chiral , 4th kind of) neutrino. I understand the search was prompted by anomalous data from the earlier MiniBooNE and LSND experiments and the desire to explain dark matter in the universe but … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Three kinds of neutrinos – no more, no less

CERN LHC beams return after 3 years

The CERN complex – chain of accelerators and all experiments – went through major upgrades in the last three years. And finally, on October 19, 2021, counter-rotating protons were injected into the LHC.  After two weeks of beam tests including low-energy collisions in … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on CERN LHC beams return after 3 years

Hubble tension

Shown above: values of the expansion rate of the universe (Hubble constant H0) from direct and indirect measurements by different missions, with the grey and pink bands showing the 68% confidence-level values from SH0ES and Planck, respectively. Problem “Local measurements … Continue reading

Posted in astronomy, physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Hubble tension

It is all quiet on the particle physics front

Experimental side of elementary particle physics is very expensive and technically challenging. Theoretical side involves very difficult calculations requiring supercomputers. Esoteric BSM (beyond Standard Model) theories are waiting for confirmation. It seems that there will be decades before we find … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on It is all quiet on the particle physics front

Can electron be split in topological insulators?

I was shocked when I saw John Preskill’s tweet shown above. I am no expert in condensed matter physics. I was a professional physicist in the past specializing in beam-beam interactions (accelerator physics) and I follow particle physics very closely. … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Can electron be split in topological insulators?

Progress report on scientific research in Turkey

Turkish Academy of Sciences published a report prepared by Ufuk Akçiğit (University of Chicago) and Elif Özcan-Tok examining the academic environment in Turkey. The report is based on datasets Scopus and MAG (Microsoft Academic Graph). http://www.tuba.gov.tr/tr/yayinlar/suresiz-yayinlar/raporlar/turkiye-bilim-raporu The report is written … Continue reading

Posted in science, society | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Progress report on scientific research in Turkey

Concept of dimension revisited

In the vernacular the term “dimension” usually refers to a hidden realm. In the scientific literature the meaning of “dimension” depends on the branch of science. In physics “dimension” usually refers to spatial dimensions: the 3 spatial dimensions of external … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Concept of dimension revisited

My first conversation with GPT-3

I was invited to be a beta tester of the OpenAI‘s GPT-3 related products. Here’s my first conversation with the Davinci engine. Q: Hi GPT-3, are you a conscious entity? A: Yes. Q: What makes you a conscious entity? A: … Continue reading

Posted in computer science | Tagged , , | Comments Off on My first conversation with GPT-3

Centennial of Shrii Shrii Anandamurti

We are celebrating the 100th birthday of Prabhat Ranjan Sarkar (May 21, 1921 – October 21, 1990), also known by his spiritual name Shrii Shrii Anandamurti. The digital archive of Shrii Shrii Anandamurti’s books and discourses can be found at  https://anandamarga.net/ee9/ His call … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Centennial of Shrii Shrii Anandamurti

First results from Fermilab muon g-2 experiment: more confusion

Particle physicists have been waiting for the results from the Fermilab muon g-2 experiment with great anticipation. Results from the first run of the experiment were announced on April 7, 2021. I congratulate the E989 collaboration for performing this extraordinarily … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on First results from Fermilab muon g-2 experiment: more confusion

Still here

My job situation has changed! For the third time in my career, I experienced total loss of seniority and started from scratch. I went back to the young man’s schedule of 12 hour work days doing programming and data analysis … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Still here

John Preskill’s lectures (CALTECH quantum computing course)

John Preskill’s lectures from the first term of CALTECH quantum computing course have been posted on YouTube. Ph/CS 219A Quantum Computation – YouTube John Preskill is Richard P. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at CALTECH and the director of IQIM … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on John Preskill’s lectures (CALTECH quantum computing course)

Latest finding from SWARM studying Earth’s magnetic field

I have written about ESA’s SWARM satellite constellation in 2015. In that post I mentioned this link that provides a wealth of information about the SWARM project. Swarm – eoPortal Directory – Satellite Missions SWARM scientists recently discovered [1] that … Continue reading

Posted in geophysics | Tagged | Comments Off on Latest finding from SWARM studying Earth’s magnetic field

Number of papers published by the Large Hadron Collider collaborations

“2852 papers: from the first publications in 2008 that described the detector designs, through 2012’s discovery of the Higgs Boson, all the way to CMS’s 1000th publication in 2020.” – CERN “…along with the 2852 publications by CERN’s LHC experiments, … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Number of papers published by the Large Hadron Collider collaborations

A survey of young particle physicists in Europe

A diverse group of about 180 early-career researchers in particle physics (mostly experimental physicists) provided feedback as part of the recent update of the European strategy for particle physics (ESPP). I wanted to share their executive summary and few statistics. … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on A survey of young particle physicists in Europe

A brief history of hadron colliders

The CERN Courier has a nice article summarizing the history of hadron colliders. Discovery machines – CERN Courier written by two leaders of the Large Hadron Collider project Lyn Evans (former LHC project director), Imperial College London  Peter Jenni (former ATLAS spokesperson), … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on A brief history of hadron colliders

Are we oversimplifying?

I get overwhelmed with wonder when I contemplate the vastness of the Cosmos and the miracle of life. The truth of it all is beyond intellectual understanding. I know that! But, it is important for me to present a rational … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy | Tagged | Comments Off on Are we oversimplifying?

On vacuum fluctuations

In my post titled “How do we know vacuum fluctuations exist?” [1] I was careful to add the terminology “zero-point fluctuations in quantum fields” in parenthesis right after “vacuum fluctuations“. According to Arnold Neumeier [2] the terminology of “vacuum fluctuation” … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on On vacuum fluctuations

Duality Rotation

In recent posts ([1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7]) I have been introducing the  (Confinement) and  (Liberation) hypothesis . So far, I have discussed two modalities of the {} interplay: 1) orthogonality 2) coupling. Here, I will discuss another … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Duality Rotation

Coupling

This is the follow-up to my previous post titled “Orthogonality“. Symbolism: Circle is a geometric symbol of (Confinement). Straight line is a geometric symbol of (Liberation) . For the definitions of and please see the “Orthogonality” article and the references … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Coupling

Orthogonality

I will continue to elaborate on the (Confinement) and (Liberation) hypothesis mentioned in [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. acts and reacts. This is a simplistic description. We have to consider the modalities of the {, } interplay. One of the … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Orthogonality

Connectivity, Interaction, Communication

Long time ago I wrote 2 articles titled “Different kinds of connectivity” and “Network Externalities“. This is a fascinating topic. I intended to follow up. I guess the time is now. I wrote few more articles related to the concept … Continue reading

Posted in society | Tagged , | Comments Off on Connectivity, Interaction, Communication

Three Number Systems (thanks to John Baez for reminder)

John Baez deserves a huge credit for educating us tirelessly over the years. There is a treasure of knowledge in his website and blogs. This Week’s Finds in Mathematical Physics  Fun Stuff (expository writings and other diversions) Seminar (tons of course notes) Serious … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics | Tagged | Comments Off on Three Number Systems (thanks to John Baez for reminder)

My response to Wolchover’s question: What is a particle?

In her recent Quanta Magazine article titled “What is a Particle?” Natalie Wolchover lists the main categories of answers by the professional physicists as follows: A Particle Is a ‘Collapsed Wave Function’ A Particle Is a ‘Quantum Excitation of a … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on My response to Wolchover’s question: What is a particle?

How do we know vacuum fluctuations exist?

Experimental evidence for vacuum fluctuations (zero-point fluctuations in quantum fields) come from the observations of the Lamb shift in the energy levels of the Hydrogen atom, observations of the Casimir effect and the g-2 experiments with electrons and muons. Lamb … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on How do we know vacuum fluctuations exist?

Reading CERN Courier (2)

The online magazine CERN Courier is the most informative resource in particle and accelerator physics. This is the second installment of my “Reading CERN Courier” series. Most read articles at CERN Courier Why does CP violation matter in the universe?  (John Ellis) The … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Reading CERN Courier (2)

Tropes in Physics

This article is not about literary tropes nor about tropes mentioned in the context of computer software. This article is about the concept of tropes discussed in philosophy and physics. The SEP article titled “Tropes” [1] is very detailed and … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, philosophy, physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Tropes in Physics

Basics of Theoretical Computer Science

I have a friend who is very knowledgeable and skilled in many areas including theoretical computer science. During our conversations he uses terms like “halting problem”, “Turing machine”, “Gödel’s incompleteness theorem”. I felt the need to learn the basics of … Continue reading

Posted in computer science | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Basics of Theoretical Computer Science

Volcanoes of Anatolia

In my 2013 blogpost “Mystery of Mount Ararat” I said that humans were always fascinated by volcanic mountains. There is a connection between the human psyche and volcanoes. Well…the connection may be more than psychological. There may be biological reasons … Continue reading

Posted in geology | Tagged , | Comments Off on Volcanoes of Anatolia

Fiber Bundles in Physics

Another subject I avoided for many years: fiber bundles in physics. It was highly recommended to me that I should read this paper first: “Fiber Bundles and Quantum Theory” by Herbert J. Bernstein and Anthony V. Phillips published in Scientific … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Fiber Bundles in Physics

Reviewed and updated QM articles

I reviewed my earlier blogposts related to Quantum Mechanics and updated some of them. I did my best to turn these articles into tutorials. There are few philosophical (euphemism for speculative) pieces. I clearly indicated those. Pure States and Mixed … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Reviewed and updated QM articles

dimensions-math.org

I discovered a wonderful tutorial movie and web site on Topology and Geometry http://www.dimensions-math.org/Dim_regarder_E.htm (watch online) I recommend that you watch the movie first before you read the text on the web pages http://www.dimensions-math.org/Dim_tour_E.htm (tour/guide) http://www.dimensions-math.org/Dim_chap_E.htm (details) I congratulate Jos … Continue reading

Posted in geometry | Tagged , | Comments Off on dimensions-math.org

Bifurcating self-interaction concept of Frank van den Bovenkamp

I have brought your attention to Frank van den Bovenkamp’s work before. Pioneers of Microvita Research (2): Frank van den Bovenkamp Microvita links He recently published an important paper. The Hydrogen Atom as an Integrative Eigenstate of the Bifurcating Quantum … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Comments Off on Bifurcating self-interaction concept of Frank van den Bovenkamp

Roger Penrose wins the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020

Roger Penrose became a Nobel laureate at the age of 89. His contributions to physics and mathematics are well recognized. He has many awards, just look at the “awards” section of the Wikipedia article about him. Please also take a … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Roger Penrose wins the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020

Do not confuse spin direction with spin magnitude

A fermion will impart  units of spin angular momentum irrespective of its energy when it interacts with other particles or fields. The direction of the spin angular momentum is discussed below. A gauge boson will impart  units of spin angular … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Do not confuse spin direction with spin magnitude

Lake Baikal

During the Covid-19 stay-at-home period I started watching YouTube videos on the big screen TV instead of the computer screen. It seems that YouTube recommendation algorithm works differently when you access it through a cable TV service. Anyways, I started … Continue reading

Posted in geology | Tagged , | Comments Off on Lake Baikal

Experimental verification of Higgs boson couplings to elementary particles

Thanks to the heroic efforts of thousands of experimental physicists, engineers and technicians we have learned that the Higgs field is real. Experimental exploration of the Higgs field and its quantum Higgs boson is an ongoing effort. At this point, … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Experimental verification of Higgs boson couplings to elementary particles

Physics Education in the United States (statistics)

In the last two decades there was a sharp increase in the number of physics degrees. Physics PhD is 5-7 years of hard work. Data on graduate education in Physics Data on undergraduate education in Physics I published a physics … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Physics Education in the United States (statistics)

First observation of W-boson pair creation from two photons

Photons do not interact with each other because photons do not carry any electric charge. In the presence of very strong electric and magnetic fields, however, there are possibilities for two photons to interact indirectly. In the presence of strong … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on First observation of W-boson pair creation from two photons

Latest on the Element Lithium

The diagram above shows the relative abundances of the elements. Elements Li (Lithium), Be (Beryllium) and B (Boron) stand out. Theoretically, they are supposed to be more abundant than C (Carbon) but they are not. The smaller the atomic number … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Latest on the Element Lithium

Fourth type of neutrino does not exist

I have been betting against the fourth type of neutrino. You don’t have to be a seer to make this prediction because there is overwhelming evidence against the existence of the fourth generation of fermions. Now, there is more experimental … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Fourth type of neutrino does not exist

Lepton universality is verified (no new physics)

In my December 27, 2015 post titled “Lepton Universality” I reported about the early experimental signs pointing to a possible violation of the lepton universality. More data and analysis from the ATLAS experiment at CERN showed however that the lepton … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Lepton universality is verified (no new physics)

Guest post by Richard Gauthier: Natural Laws and Mysticism in the Cosmic Cycle of Creation

When I saw Richard Gauthier’s recent article I wanted to share this exceptional article with the readers. With his permission I present the full article here as a guest post. The links to this article are: https://www.academia.edu/43732448/Natural_Laws_and_Mysticism_in_the_Cosmic_Cycle_of_Creation  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343225050_Natural_Laws_and_Mysticism_in_the_Cosmic_Cycle_of_Creation There is … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, science, spiritual philosophy | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Guest post by Richard Gauthier: Natural Laws and Mysticism in the Cosmic Cycle of Creation

Semiotic Closure

The concept of “semantic closure” was introduced and developed by Howard H. Pattee in the context of Biology [1][2][3][4]. L. M. Rocha called this concept “semiotic closure”. In a special issue of Biosystems journal (Volume 60, No: 1-3) edited by L. … Continue reading

Posted in biology, physics, science | Tagged | Comments Off on Semiotic Closure

Individuality and Collectivity

Jordana Cepelewicz of Quanta Magazine wrote an article titled “What is an Individual? Biology Seeks Clues in Information Theory” [1] where she summarized the work of David Krakauer, Jessica Flack, Nils Bertschinger, Eckehard Olbrich and Nihat Ay. The scientific paper … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Individuality and Collectivity

Confinement and Liberation

As I study natural processes, especially in the context of physics, I see 2 fundamental explanatory factors in play. I have referred to these factors as ‘Binding Action‘ and ‘Freedom Seeking‘ in the past. Perhaps a better terminology for these … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, philosophy, physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Confinement and Liberation

Comments on universe being a fluctuation

Richard Gauthier has responded to my post titled “Universe is not a fluctuation”. Please find his comments below. This inspired me to recollect my thoughts on the emergence of the physical universe. This is a subject I have been avoiding. … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Comments on universe being a fluctuation

Universe is not a fluctuation

Andromeda galaxy (credit: NASA) “We therefore conclude that the universe is not a fluctuation, and that the order is a memory of conditions when things started. This is not to say that we understand the logic of it. For some … Continue reading

Posted in cosmology, physics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Universe is not a fluctuation

How to implement random article pointer in JavaScript

I cannot do this in the WordPress.com platform because it does not let me execute JavaScript. But, in other platforms you can do this: In other words, you prepare a list of URLs and point to one of them using … Continue reading

Posted in computer science | Comments Off on How to implement random article pointer in JavaScript

Ignoring Agency is Ignorance

I came up with the title ‘Ignoring Agency is Ignorance‘ while reading  David Berlinski’s article at the Inference magazine where he reviews Brian Green’s book “Until the End of Time“. In that article David Berlinski touches on many subjects especially … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, science | Tagged | Comments Off on Ignoring Agency is Ignorance

Machine Learning Interview Questions

image credit I recommend that beginners start with Roger Huang’s 41 questions and answers about Machine Learning. On his webpage Roger Huang provides links to further reading as well. It is clear that Machine Learning uses many statistical techniques. Therefore, … Continue reading

Posted in computer science, machine learning | Tagged , | Comments Off on Machine Learning Interview Questions

Large refugee waves to Anatolia in recent centuries

There were waves upon waves of migrations into and out of Anatolia going back to the prehistoric times. As a result, Anatolia has been a melting pot for thousands of years. Each tribe, nation, and culture left an imprint. There … Continue reading

Posted in society | Tagged , | Comments Off on Large refugee waves to Anatolia in recent centuries

Happy to learn Maldacena’s thoughts on the relationship between vacuum fluctuations and spacetime stretching

Natalie Wolchover wrote another excellent article. This one is titled “Why Gravity Is Not Like the Other Forces“. She talked to 4 well-known physicists about gravity. This is what Juan Maldacena communicated to her. “Furthermore, from the perspective of particle … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Happy to learn Maldacena’s thoughts on the relationship between vacuum fluctuations and spacetime stretching

Theoretical value of muon g-2 updated

Fermilab E989 experiment This is a follow-up on my post titled “Muon g-2 mystery“. FERMILAB announcement on June 11, 2020: FERMILAB announced that the latest consensus theoretical value of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (published on June 8, … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Theoretical value of muon g-2 updated

What percentage of scientists are atheists?

image credit: Pew Research Center Statistics shown above was published in 2009. I don’t think the numbers changed significantly between 2009 and 2020. The study was based on a survey conducted among the members of the American Association for the … Continue reading

Posted in science, society | Tagged , | Comments Off on What percentage of scientists are atheists?

The non-gauge nature of the newly discovered forces

Gian Francesco Giudice is the head of CERN Theoretical Physics Department. He has written an important essay titled “On Future High-Energy Colliders“. This is not about the technical details of future colliders. He discusses the current state and the future … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on The non-gauge nature of the newly discovered forces

Concept of Gauge Invariance

I agonized over this post. I thought I could explain the concept of “gauge invariance” in simple terms but I couldn’t. This subject requires a lot of background. So, I will not attempt to present a tutorial here. Instead, I … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics, physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Concept of Gauge Invariance

Stephen Wolfram’s Theory of Everything

Stephen Wolfram On April 14, 2020 Stephen Wolfram published a long article summarizing the results of his research towards a fundamental theory of physics. He does not use the terminology “ToE” (Theory of Everything) but many science journalists and scientists … Continue reading

Posted in computer science, physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Stephen Wolfram’s Theory of Everything

Few Research Directions in Systems Neuroscience

Amos Tversky (1937-1996) Being a graduate student is hard. You have to be a little lucky to be at the right place at the right time and work with the right professor. It is also about preparation and background, of … Continue reading

Posted in brain, Neuroscience, science | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Few Research Directions in Systems Neuroscience

Guest Post by Richard Gauthier on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model

Today I am happy to publish a guest post by Richard Gauthier. I follow his physics research very closely.  After receiving a B.Sc. degree in physics from M.I.T in 1967, Richard Gauthier earned a M.Sc. degree in physics from University … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Guest Post by Richard Gauthier on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model

Notes (May 2020)

John Baez keeps educating us tirelessly. There is a treasure of knowledge in his website and blogs. I particularly follow his diary. The image above is from his April 13 section of April 2020 diary. Baez tells the story of … Continue reading

Posted in physics, science | Tagged , | Comments Off on Notes (May 2020)

Reading CERN Courier (1)

For those who follow particle physics closely the online magazine CERN Courier is probably the most informative resource.  I thought it would be a good idea to communicate my picks from CERN Courier. I hope to do this few times … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on Reading CERN Courier (1)

Howard H. Pattee and the Physics of Symbols

In my opinion, the scientific observations of theoretical biologist Howard H. Pattee are very relevant for the future progress of science. A special issue of Biosystems journal (Volume 60, No: 1-3) was dedicated to his work. The editor was Luis … Continue reading

Posted in biology, science | Tagged | Comments Off on Howard H. Pattee and the Physics of Symbols

Neutrinos and Antineutrinos Change Flavors at Different Rates

image credit: Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta Magazine. The T2K experiment in Japan reported in Nature (April 15, 2020) that neutrinos have a higher probability of oscillating than antineutrinos. There is great excitement about this result. Until now CP symmetry violation has not … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Neutrinos and Antineutrinos Change Flavors at Different Rates

Quantum Mechanics, Probability, Covid-19 Analogy

I hesitated to include “Covid-19” in the title. This is not a commentary on the scientific, social, economic aspects of the Covid-19 crisis. This is about an analogy between the probability of catching Covid-19 and the concept of probability used … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics, physics, probability | Comments Off on Quantum Mechanics, Probability, Covid-19 Analogy

No useful theory of biological neural computation yet

image credit: Human Connectome Project I was very surprised to learn that neuroscientists have no useful theory of biological neural computation yet. I recommend reference [4] for a review. In addition to that paper, here’s few quotes from other authorities: … Continue reading

Posted in Neuroscience | Tagged , | Comments Off on No useful theory of biological neural computation yet

Interesting anecdote about Roger Penrose as told by Carlo Rovelli

image credit: F. Viadotto The highlight of the “Twistors and Loops” conference (September 2019) was Roger Penrose’s talk. Carlo Rovelli summarized Penrose’s talk in a CERN Courier article and mentioned this amusing incident: “The best moment came during Roger Penrose’s … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Interesting anecdote about Roger Penrose as told by Carlo Rovelli

On the transformation of neutrino into electron

Neutrinos rarely interact with matter. When they do a neutrino can transform into an electron if the neutrino is very energetic (see details below). An electron, on the other hand, does not transform into a neutrino so easily. Empirically speaking, … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , | Comments Off on On the transformation of neutrino into electron

Conservation Laws of Particle Interactions

Definitions: Lepton number : +1 for the particles in the green boxes (see the diagram above), namely, electron, muon, tau, electron type neutrino, muon type neutrino, tau type neutrino, -1 for their antiparticles, 0 for others. Baryon number = 1/3 … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Conservation Laws of Particle Interactions

How to create antiprotons

I was a post-doc at FERMILAB between 1988-1992. I worked on the Tevatron which was a proton-antiproton collider. In those days I took the presence of antiprotons for granted. I knew, of course, how difficult it was to produce, collect … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on How to create antiprotons

Free Book Commemorating the 25’th Anniversary of the Simons Foundation

image credit First, you should know that I am not employed by any company or foundation associated with Jim Simons. His foundation has been supporting science for many years and making a big difference. That’s why I wanted to write … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , | Comments Off on Free Book Commemorating the 25’th Anniversary of the Simons Foundation

2020 update on the location of the magnetic north pole

The magnetic north pole has been drifting from Canada to Siberia. This post is a follow up on the 2019 update. image source The green dot indicates the 2020 location of the magnetic north pole. The 2020 location of the … Continue reading

Posted in geophysics | Tagged | Comments Off on 2020 update on the location of the magnetic north pole

My obsession with the pageview count

Popular YouTubers get 500K views for a single video. For bloggers this is rare because young people don’t read anymore. For a blogger like me who writes about physics, metaphysics and spiritual philosophy the pageviews are way lower. As of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on My obsession with the pageview count

Brookhaven Electron-Ion Collider

After many years of evaluation the United States Department of Energy decided that EIC (Electron-Ion Collider) would be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island in New York in the next 10 years. Brookhaven Lab currently hosts the … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Brookhaven Electron-Ion Collider

Dark Energy Controversies

In a recent post titled “Recent discussions on dark energy” I discussed various speculations on the nature of dark energy assuming dark energy is real. It never occurred to me that the data analyses of 2 independent teams lead by … Continue reading

Posted in cosmology, physics | Tagged | Comments Off on Dark Energy Controversies

Useful metaphysics

I envision a new discipline that would be a unique blend of physics, metaphysics and spiritual philosophy combining the analytical approach with the synthetic approach. A practitioner of this new discipline would not be shy about using mathematical language and … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, mind, philosophy, physics, science, society | Tagged , | Comments Off on Useful metaphysics

Hedda H. Mørch, John Horgan, Pandeism

Hedda Hassel Mørch is a philosopher at  Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences. She answered John Horgan’s questions on various subjects. I was very happy to find this gem in that interview: “As I said, science only captures the physical … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy | Tagged , | Comments Off on Hedda H. Mørch, John Horgan, Pandeism