Author Archives: Suresh Emre

About Suresh Emre

I have worked as a physicist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. I am a volunteer for the Renaissance Universal movement. My main goal is to inspire the reader to engage in Self-discovery and expansion of consciousness.

You know, it would be sufficient to really understand the electron

 image credit: Dave Whyte “You know, it would be sufficient to really understand the electron.” – Albert Einstein as quoted by Hans G. Dehmelt in his 1989 Nobel lecture. Hans G. Dehmelt recently passed away on March 7, 2017.  His … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

How long does it take to reach the bottom?

Under this title you expected me to say something philosophical, right? No, today’s story is more prosaic. My father was a coal mining engineer. He worked in the underground coal mines in Turkey for 25 years. When I was in … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , ,

Primordial qubit network perspective

If you read the recent articles [1][2][3][4] you will realize that more and more physicists are thinking of space-time and gravity as emergent phenomena. These days it is fashionable to think of the primordial fabric of the universe as a … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, physics | Tagged , , , ,

On the photon-photon interaction

image credit In my post titled “On the photon frequency” I emphasized the fact that photons do not interact with other photons, they pass through each other. Why? Because photons do not have electric charge. Some of you may have seen … Continue reading

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The Legacy of the Tevatron by S.D. Holmes and V.D. Shiltsev

In Chris Quigg’s Twitter feed I discovered this gem: The Legacy of the Tevatron in the Area of Accelerator Science by Stephen D. Holmes and Vladimir D. Shiltsev. I was a post-doctoral researcher at Fermilab between August 1988-November 1992. During … Continue reading

Posted in history, physics | Tagged ,

In 4 space dimensions all knots can be unraveled

Nobel laureate Frank Wilczek reminds us in his tutorial article at the Quanta magazine that in 4 space dimensions all knots can be unraveled completely. He explains it as follows: “In three space dimensions, knot theory is a subtle, complicated … Continue reading

Posted in geometry | Tagged , , ,

Stanford

Don’t ask me why. It just is.  

Posted in inspiration | Tagged

A profile of Roger Penrose by Philip Ball

I have mentioned several times in this blog that Roger Penrose is one of my three heroes in physics – others being Albert Einstein and Gerard ‘t Hooft. The UK magazine Prospect published a profile of Roger Penrose. I enjoyed this … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics, philosophy, physics | Tagged

Updates (February 2017)

I am going through a dry period spiritually. I cannot write inspirational (let alone inspired) pieces these days but I still want to write informative articles. In this “updates” post I wanted to mention two major developments in the world … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , , ,

Sounds of Aya Sophia

Stanford University scientists have digitally created Aya Sophia’s acoustics and played the sounds in Stanford University’s Bing Concert Hall as if it was Aya Sophia. You can listen to these sounds in the video in the Smithsonian article. They collaborated with … Continue reading

Posted in linguistics, music | Tagged

EDGE 2017 question and 206 responses by invited contributors

The EDGE 2017 question: What scientific term or concept ought to be more widely known? You can find the 206 responses by the invited contributors at the following address (the EDGE web site is a little slow, the initial load of this web … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, physics, science, society

Update on how Earth’s magnetic field is changing

The European Space Agency (ESA) has a trio of satellites known as SWARM that studies Earth’s magnetic field. “Launched in 2013, the trio of Swarm satellites are measuring and untangling the different magnetic fields that stem from Earth’s core, mantle, … Continue reading

Posted in geology, geophysics | Tagged , , ,

John Hagelin’s “Restructuring Physics” article from 1989

Latest results from the proton decay experiment at the Super-K laboratory in Japan ruled-out the simplest GUT models seeking the unification of “strong nuclear”, “weak nuclear” and electromagnetic forces at high energies. Among the proposed GUT models, the one known as the “flipped SU(5)” … Continue reading

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Updates (December 2016)

ALPHA experiment at CERN ALPHA experiment observed one of the spectral lines of antihydrogen for the first time. The measurement was done by observing the 1S-2S transition. CPT symmetry demands that the spectra of hydrogen and antihydrogen be identical. The … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Reflections on this anniversary of Sheb-i Arus (2016)

December 17, 2016 On this anniversary of Sheb-i Arus (Rumi’s night of Divine Union with his Beloved) I am deeply saddened by the unbearable suffering of people in Syria and my homeland Anatolia as well. During Rumi’s years in Konya in the 13’th … Continue reading

Posted in spirituality, sufism | Tagged

Cartoon guide to quantum computing by Scott Aaronson and Zach Weinersmith

Scott Aaronson and Zach Weinersmith worked on a wonderful educational project. They explain Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Computing very concisely in the cartoon format. When I viewed the visuals and read the text I appreciated Scott Aaronson’s talent in stating the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged ,

Qubit

Image credit Quantum Computing has entered my radar. I am a little ashamed that I ignored this subject for so long. We are entering a new era. In the forthcoming blogposts I will try to inform you about the recent technological breakthroughs … Continue reading

Posted in physics, quantum computing | Tagged ,

Book bunker below Bryant Park

I have recently learned that there is a book bunker below the Bryant Park. This is a concrete-encased and climate-controlled book vault with 55,600 square feet of space that extends west from the main branch of the New York Public Library … Continue reading

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Unsolved problems in physics

Image credit: “particle collisions” by Xiaoling Zeng (Quanta Magazine) Wikipedia maintains a list of unsolved problems in physics. From that list I picked the ones I consider as key questions. In the second section I remind readers about more fundamental questions … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Nobel Prizes for Accelerator/Beam Physics

In the field of accelerator/beam physics and technology there have been many epoch-making innovations but unfortunately only very few of those were recognized with a Nobel Prize. When I go through the list of Nobel laureates I see only these physicists … Continue reading

Posted in history, physics | Tagged , , , , ,

A guide to Richard Gauthier’s Electron Models

Richard Gauthier’s electron models deserve a serious look. I am in the process of studying them. I asked Richard few questions and he kindly answered them. His answers were very helpful to me and it may be helpful to others as … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Knowledgebase

My dream is to see the day when we have a world-wide-knowledgebase. The word “knowledgebase” is inspired by the word “database.” A knowledgebase, however, is supposed to be much more than a database. The entire internet (world-wide-web) can be thought of as a rudimentary … Continue reading

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Updates (November 2016)

Erik Verlinde’s latest paper on his effort to develop a new (emergent) theory of gravitation received a lot of attention in the media. This theory (still in its early stages) certainly deserves a careful look. ◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊ Steven Weinberg thinks that Quantum Mechanics … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

L.V. Lorenz and H.A. Lorentz

J.D. Jackson passed away on May 20, 2016. His book “Classical Electrodynamics” is a classic textbook. Like all physicists of my generation I have spent hundreds of hours studying classical electrodynamics from his book. The paper by J.D. Jackson and L.B. … Continue reading

Posted in history, physics | Tagged , ,

Edward Witten’s 2014 Kyoto Prize commemorative lecture

Edward Witten has been one of the most respected physicists in the world for the last four decades. His contributions to physics and mathematics have been recognized by many awards and prizes. Edward Witten’s Kyoto Prize commemorative lecture is an important document. The … Continue reading

Posted in history, physics, science | Tagged ,

Geometrical versus Topological

NYC geographical map shown below is an example of geometrical representation. The distances between the boroughs of NYC are proportional to the actual distances. NYC subway diagram shown below is an example of topological representation. On this topological map the distances between the boroughs … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics | Tagged , , ,

Super performance of the Large Hadron Collider in 2016

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN concluded its 2016 proton-proton run.  Integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC this year was far above the expectation. The following graphs summarize the performance numbers. For a definition of (inverse femtobarn) see this blogpost.

Posted in physics | Tagged , , ,

Fourth type of neutrino has never been observed

Image credit There are 3 types of neutrinos. 1) electron type 2) muon type 3) tau type.  A neutrino may change its type spontaneously. As they travel, they may change from one type to another. This is one of the great … Continue reading

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Guest Post by Raymond Bates on Panpsychism

Raymond Bates lives in the Philippines with his wife and two teenage children. He is the author of five books. “The Microvitic Atom“, “The Internal Being, Reincarnational and Intuitive Psychology“, “Macrogenesis, A New Paradigm in Consciousness“, “Biometaphysics, A theory of … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy

Few comments on Horgan’s bunk-bashing diatribe

Image credit John Horgan is an effective communicator. He has a provocative style. His writings always succeed in creating an emotional response. His books are fun to read because they are informative and controversial at the same time. He knows … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, philosophy, physics | Tagged

Roger Penrose’s latest book: Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy

I often say that my three heroes in physics are Albert Einstein, Gerard ‘t Hooft and Roger Penrose. I try to read all books written by Roger Penrose. His latest book is titled “Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Atiyah lecture at 2016 Heidelberg Laureate Forum

Image credit Before you watch Atiyah’s wonderful lecture given at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum you should first read these two blogpost by Ben Orlin: 21 Essential Quotes from Sir Michael Atiyah interview (Quanta Magazine): Michael Atiyah’s Imaginative State of Mind … Continue reading

Posted in mathematics | Tagged

Matthew Buckley’s particle physics tutorial articles at Boston Review

I highly recommend Matthew Buckley’s review articles at Boston Review. These are excellent tutorials. “This eight-part series maps the frontiers of contemporary particle physics. It begins with an introduction to the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the seventeen-mile-long Large Hadron … Continue reading

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Epistemic uncertainty

Image credit Definitions/origins of the terms ontic/ontological and epistemic/epistemological from Susanne Bobzien: ontic: is concerned with being (Greek ‘to on’, that which is) ontological: is concerned with the theory of being (Greek ‘logos’,among other things: theory) epistemic: is concerned with knowledge … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, physics | Tagged , ,

CASW Showcase interview with Natalie Wolchover

Image credit Natalie Wolchover is my favorite science journalist. I have been enjoying her articles at the Quanta Magazine. She focuses on the developments in fundamental physics. She has recently won the 2016 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, a prize given annually … Continue reading

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bioRxiv: the preprint server for Biology

http://www.biorxiv.org/ Descriptions from the bioRxiv website below: bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. Articles … Continue reading

Posted in biology | Tagged ,

Can astronauts see the stars by the naked eye in space?

If you do a little research on the web you will find that the majority of the so-called experts insist that stars are visible by the naked eye in space. What bothers me is that none of those “experts” are … Continue reading

Posted in physics, science | Tagged , ,

LMFDB: unifying the building blocks of mathematics

image credit: http://www.lmfdb.org The LMFDB is a new web resource developed by a large team of mathematicians around the world. The www.lmfdb.org describes LMFDB as the database of L-functions, modular forms, and related objects. L-functions are like the DNA of mathematics. The article … Continue reading

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Tanedo on the 17 MeV Anomaly in Beryllium Nuclear Decays

I have referred to Philip Tanedo* as a “rising star” in my 2015 blogpost titled “Physics Tutorials by Philip Tanedo.” In 2015 he was a post-doctoral research fellow at the UC Irvine physics department. His group at the UC Irvine (led by Jonathan … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

A lot is happening

A lot is happening in my life, in the physics world, and in my home country Turkey. I watched in horror what happened in Turkey last month. I am very proud of my fellow Turkish countrymen. I admired their courage … Continue reading

Posted in physics, psychology, science, society

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is breaking performance records

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has reached its design luminosity: . This is a significant milestone. I congratulate everyone who was involved in the design, construction and operation of the LHC. I also congratulate everyone who work on the accelerators that feed … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , ,

FERMILAB History and Archives Project

All universities and national laboratories should maintain historical archives. The Fermilab History and Archives Project is exemplary. You can start with “A Brief History of Fermilab” and continue with “Significant Staff” and then explore the entire website. When I was at Fermilab between … Continue reading

Posted in history, physics | Tagged

Helen Thom Edwards

Helen T. Edwards passed away on June 21, 2016 at the age of 80. She was one of the most successful and influential female physicists of the 20’th century. She dedicated her life to the advancement of accelerator and beam … Continue reading

Posted in history, physics | Tagged

The 500 article milestone: time for reflection

This is my 501st article in the Renaissance Universal blog. Before this one I have published 492 (dated) posts and 8 (undated) pages here. I have another blog for my Turkish readers (98 posts and 10 pages so far). The … Continue reading

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Galileo’s Diagramma Della Verita

Galileo’s mysterious booklet “Diagramma Della Verita” is mentioned in Dan Brown’s “Angels and Demons.” The rumor is that there is a copy of this booklet in the Vatican Archives. I doubt it. It is clear that “Diagramma Della Verita” is a … Continue reading

Posted in society | Tagged , ,

Curious about lunar calendars

Image credit I don’t understand lunar calendars. They are complicated, they don’t follow the seasons. What was the original reason for adopting lunar calendars? During the Paleolithic period when most humans were hunter-gatherers the accurate measurement of the solar year … Continue reading

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How long astronauts stayed on the moon?

Image credit I have watched the documentary titled “The Last Man on the Moon” which is a documentary about the life of the astronaut Eugene A. Cernan. I did not know that Gene Cernan and the geologist astronaut Harrison H. … Continue reading

Posted in geology, science, society | Tagged , , ,

Subspace

Image credit I often ideate on the Absolute Being (Godhead, Nirguna Brahma) as the “infinite ocean of love and bliss.” I came across a page titled “On the Shore of the Boundless Ocean” on Frank van den Bovenkamp’s website. On that page … Continue reading

Posted in Microvita | Tagged ,

Lost in translation (3)

Aşk olmadan Keşf olmaz. Literal translation from Turkish: Keşf is not possible without Love. Keşf  (pronounced “kashf” – “sh” as in “shall” ) can mean any of these the process of discovering the truth the process of acquiring intuitive knowledge … Continue reading

Posted in inspiration, linguistics | Tagged ,

Counterfactual definiteness

Counterfactual (adjective) : expressing what has not happened but could, would, or might under differing conditions – British Dictionary Counterfactual (noun) : a conditional statement in which the first clause is a past tense subjunctive statement expressing something contrary to … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, physics | Tagged ,

Updates (May 2016)

You can watch the status of LHC beam collisions live at the following link.https://op-webtools.web.cern.ch/vistar/vistars.php?usr=LHC3 Mark Alford’s 2015 tutorial paper in arXiv explains the concepts and terminology used in the discussions of Bell Inequality in Quantum Mechanics very clearly. In terms of clarity, … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Pioneers of Microvita Research (3): Hans-Joachim Rudolph

Hans-Joachim Rudolph was born in 1950. He was interested in contemplative and scientific thinking from an early age. He was educated in Würzburg, Göttingen, Berlin and Munich studying the basics of philosophy, mathematics, physics and the history of arts before joining medical college. … Continue reading

Posted in Microvita, science | Tagged

Pioneers of Microvita Research (2): Frank van den Bovenkamp

Frank van den Bovenkamp was born and lives in the Netherlands. His research covers a wide range from psycho-physiology to physics. He is one of the pioneers in microvita research specializing in microvita cosmology. He is best known for his wave … Continue reading

Posted in Microvita, science | Tagged

Pioneers of Microvita Research (1): Richard Gauthier

After receiving a B.Sc. degree in physics from M.I.T in 1967, Richard Gauthier earned a M.Sc. degree in physics from University of Illinois in 1971. He was in the Ph.D. doctoral program at the University of Illinois for high-energy physics … Continue reading

Posted in Microvita, physics | Tagged ,

Microvita links

For the last three decades my margii friends have been encouraging me to work on the Microvita theory. I have been resisting this because I don’t know where to start. I am overwhelmed by the enormity of the task. I always … Continue reading

Posted in Microvita | Tagged ,

Lost in translation (2)

Image credit “Haydan gelen Huya gider”  – Turkish proverb. In colloquial Turkish this proverb is used to mean “easy come easy go” but this was not the original meaning. In Turkish the suffix “dan” means “from”  and the suffix “ya” means … Continue reading

Posted in linguistics, sufism, Turkish | Tagged

What is an inverse femtobarn?

Image credit “A barn (symbol b) is a unit of area. Originally used in nuclear physics for expressing the cross sectional area of nuclei and nuclear reactions, today it is also used in all fields of high-energy physics to express … Continue reading

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Live Beam Status at LHC

Happy mother’s day! LHC beams are colliding at 13 Tev (center-of-mass) energy again. The 4 LHC experiments (ATLAS, ALICE, CMS, LHCb) are collecting data. They are back in business after the long winter shut-down. You can watch the status of … Continue reading

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EDGE 2016 question and 198 responses by the invited contributors

Nicholas Humphrey Edge-Serpentine Gallery-MAPS for the 21st Century ************************************************** The EDGE 2016 question: What do you consider the most interesting recent [scientific] news? What makes it important? You can find the 198 responses by the invited contributors at the following url: … Continue reading

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A short comment on Reichenbach’s Principle of Common Cause

When I came across this principle in Mark Alford’s tutorial paper on Bell Inequality I was intrigued: Reichenbach’s principle of common cause [1]: correlations can be explained in terms of causes. if two phenomena show a correlation, either one causes … Continue reading

Posted in physics, prediction, probability, science | Tagged , ,

Sad state of physics education in Turkey

I am very sad to report that only 16 Turkish universities have physics undergraduate programs. There are currently 193 universities in Turkey. At least 50 of them had undergraduate physics programs until recently. The Council of Higher Education of Turkey (Turkish … Continue reading

Posted in physics, science, society | Tagged

Updates (April 2016)

Image credit CERN LHC is waking up after the winter shutdown. I follow the progress of accelerator physicists, engineers and technicians from here. These log entries take me back to my Fermilab days (1988-1992) where I was doing similar work in … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Interesting karma between Einstein and Bohr

I had a new year’s resolution never to mention Einstein in my posts again. Never say never again! I have a new resolution. I will mention his name as part of physics exposition but I will no longer comment on … Continue reading

Posted in history, philosophy, physics | Tagged , , ,

Updates (March 2016)

There are many physics blogs but there are only few that are dedicated to particle physics. My favorite these days is Adam Falkowski’s blog (Resonaances) .  His concise and informative posts do an excellent job explaining the most relevant aspects of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Payback

Yesterday,  when I was approaching my office building on the 42nd Avenue in Manhattan I saw a man carrying a backpack with a sign on it. The sign said “Payback” which was written in very big letters. At that moment, I felt strongly … Continue reading

Posted in inspiration | Tagged

alla turca time

Image credit In the alla turca time Sun always sets at the 0’th hour and rises at the 12th hour. The hours of the alla turca time have variable length. During winters the length of 1 (alla turca) night hour is longer … Continue reading

Posted in society, Turkish | Tagged

Smell of space

I recently learned that space has a unique smell. Astronauts described the smell of space with these words: “sulfurous”, “seared meat”, “hot metal”, “distinct odor of ozone”, “a faint acrid smell”, “welding fumes.” Astronauts smell this distinct odor when they return … Continue reading

Posted in Biochemistry, biology | Tagged ,

Quick reminders about the leap day

I explained the difference between the sidereal day and the solar day in a previous post (one of my popular posts). A sidereal year is the time taken by the Earth to orbit the Sun once with respect to the fixed … Continue reading

Posted in astronomy, tutorial | Tagged

Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco passed away on Friday February 19, 2016 at the age of 84. He has been suffering from cancer. I am deeply saddened. He was a great intellectual. He has been a novelist, essayist, literary critic, philosopher, and semiotician. … Continue reading

Posted in linguistics, literature, philosophy | Tagged

Principle of minimal structure

I delayed this post for six months. I decided to release it today because holding it longer would mean that I am becoming timid and self-conscious with my physics speculations. Here it goes. I stayed in a hotel in Antalya … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics | Tagged

Direct observation of gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO

I was not going to mention Einstein in my posts anymore. But, the man stays relevant even after a century. Note to the young physicist: if you want to be remembered in the next century solve the mystery of gravitation. Newton … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged ,

Sugar Bliss

Image credit Many people I know – especially ladies – dream about becoming pastry shop owners. This is very interesting because I also entertain similar thoughts. My sugary thoughts are often mixed with my California dreaming. Take a look at the … Continue reading

Posted in inspiration | Tagged

Spin and charge forbid point-like self-couplings for all particles but the Higgs

Image credit “Indeed, self-interaction is the most basic of all processes allowed by quantum field theory, but spin and charge forbid point-like self-couplings for all particles but the Higgs.” from http://arxiv.org/pdf/1511.06495v1.pdf There is a shorter version of this statement in … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Lost in translation (1)

“Aşk olmayınca, meşk olmaz” – Turkish proverb Aşk (pronounced “ahshk” – “sh” as in “shall” ) means love in Turkish (Aşk covers all varieties of “love” from erotic love to Divine Love) Meşk : rigorous musical exercises musicians have to … Continue reading

Posted in inspiration | Tagged

What does an anti-atom do in a gravitational field?

What does an antihydrogen (1 anti-proton in the nucleus and 1 positron orbiting the anti-proton) atom do in a gravitational field? Does it fall down or does it fall up? If it falls down, does the anti-hydrogen have the same … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged ,

Meta-theory

Image credit I have watched the film “Particle Fever” for the second time last night. There is a nice PBS article about this film. “Particle Fever” was produced by David Kaplan who is a theoretical physicist at Johns Hopkins University. … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, philosophy, physics | Tagged ,

Few comments on Sutra 4.8 of Ananda Sutram

Image credit You may have noticed this short sutra in Ananda Sutram 4.8 [The kuńd́alinii is the (force of) fundamental negativity.] The Sanskrit original is 4.8 Kuńd́alinii sá múliibhútá rńátmiká. I want to clarify the meaning of “negativity” in this … Continue reading

Posted in spiritual philosophy | Tagged

Lepton universality

  Electron, muon and tau particles are identical except for their masses. They are identical with respect to the electromagnetic force because they carry the same electrical charge. They are also identical with respect to the weak nuclear force because … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Shrii Shrii Anandamurti’s comments on the tri-attributional primordial force

This is a follow-up on the previous posts Why 3? Why 3? (area related argument) The 3 fundamental variables are coupled pair-wise Orthogonality is harder to achieve as the number of explanatory factors increases In this post I wanted to … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, spiritual philosophy | Tagged , , ,

Orthogonality is harder to achieve as the number of explanatory factors increases

One of my favorite posts is “New Perspective on Unification” where I discuss the “horizontal” and “vertical” attributes.  Horizontal attributes are associated with collectivity and multiplicity. Vertical attributes are about individuality, individual histories and individual characteristics. In that post I also … Continue reading

Posted in mind, philosophy, science, spiritual philosophy | Tagged ,

Difference between a point particle and an extended particle

Image credit Physics textbooks and educational websites still contain information saying that elementary particles are point particles. This is not entirely correct. Modern physics theories such as String Theory start with the axiom that all physical entities have spatial extension however small … Continue reading

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Reflections on this anniversary of Rumi’s Sheb-i Arus (2015)

Image credit December 17, 2015 On this anniversary of Sheb-i Arus (Rumi’s night of Divine Union with his Beloved) I reflected on 2015’s challenges. I remembered the conditions that prompted me to post these I surrender to your infinite wisdom and love God … Continue reading

Posted in spiritual practice, sufism | Tagged ,

Hints of a Mysterious New Particle

Latest findings of the CMS and ATLAS experiments were announced in a seminar at CERN today. CMS results were presented by James Olsen (Princeton University, US) ATLAS results were presented by Marumi Kado (LAL, Paris-Saclay, France) You can obtain copies … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged , , ,

Playing catch with your father

Image credit Every time I watch the final scenes of the 1989 film “The Field of Dreams” I get very emotional.  Watching Ray playing catch with his father John appearing as a young man creates deep emotional waves in my mind. In those moments … Continue reading

Posted in spirituality | Tagged

Nobel Prize Ceremony 2015

I watched the 2015 Nobel Prize ceremony live this morning. I have never done this before. I maintain the Nobel Laureates in Physics but for some reason I was never interested in the audio-visual of the actual ceremony before. This … Continue reading

Posted in society | Tagged

Machine Learning and Big Data in the Real World according to Shivon Zilis

In my – day job – world the subjects of machine learning and big data are very fashionable. All groups in my firm are interested in the machine learning techniques. I am too old and too slow to get into … Continue reading

Posted in machine learning | Tagged ,

Why 3? (area related argument)

In the first installment I reminded the fact that there are exactly 3 generations (flavors) of fermions. This fact was established by the CERN LEP experiments (Aleph, Delphi, L3, and Opal). There is an independent confirmation of this fact by the … Continue reading

Posted in metaphysics, physics | Tagged ,

Conceptual Design Report of the Chinese Supercollider

The first time I saw any mention of the proposed Chinese Supercollider was in an IAS webpage announcing Nima Arkani-Hamed’s efforts promoting a 100 Tev collider to be built in China. “Arkani-Hamed joined forces with Yifang Wang, Director of the Institute … Continue reading

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The Crackpot Index versus the Anti-Crackpot Index

People with new ideas are often attacked by the people who are invested in the old ideas. Sometimes it is an ego thing. Intellectuals attack an idea just because it is not their idea. This goes on at all levels … Continue reading

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Grand landscape of the arXiv

The arXiv.org is a highly-automated electronic archive and distribution server for research articles. Covered areas include physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear sciences, quantitative biology and statistics. The arXiv is maintained and operated by the Cornell University Library. The arXiv.org was started by Paul Ginsparg in 1991. More than 8000 … Continue reading

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Mobius strip representation of spin 1/2

Physics The elementary particles known as fermions (electron, muon, tau and u, d, c, s, b, t quarks ) and their antiparticles are the constituents of matter. A fermion will impart  units of spin angular momentum when it interacts with … Continue reading

Posted in geometry, physics | Tagged , ,

Centennial Anniversary of Einstein’s General Relativity Theory

100 years a ago on November 25 1915 Albert Einstein presented the final version of his theory of gravitation known as the General Relativity to Prussian Academy of Sciences. The paper was published in 1916. Why do we mention David Hilbert in the … Continue reading

Posted in history, mathematics, physics | Tagged , , , ,

Confinement mechanisms in physics theories

Image credit Why do we need confinement mechanisms in physics theories? There is a fundamental binding agent in nature, that needs to be explained. The limiting, localizing, encircling, singularity seeking confining action of the fundamental binding agent is independent of theory … Continue reading

Posted in physics | Tagged

Gerard ‘t Hooft’s thoughts on the quantum nature of the universe

Image credit Gerard ‘t Hooft is one of my heros in physics. My other heros are Albert Einstein and Roger Penrose. Gerard ‘t Hooft  is known for his brilliance and clarity of thought. All his papers are examples of clear … Continue reading

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Why is space so big and particles so small?

Image credit You may have heard many physicists discussing this question in their public lectures: why is space so big? This question is equivalent to the other question “why are elementary particles so small?” The physical universe is unimaginably vast and it is … Continue reading

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1995: The Revolutionary Year in Technology

in April 1995 the NSFNET was retired and the United States Government no longer funded internet with public money. In 1995 Microsoft released Windows 95. The programming language Java was introduced in 1995 as well. This was a significant event in … Continue reading

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Crazy-old-guy syndrome among theoretical physicists

Image credit When I saw this funny text in John Preskill’s blog post I smiled broadly and wanted to share it with you. “I suppose most theoretical physicists who (like me) are comfortably past the age of 60 worry about … Continue reading

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“What is an electron?” by Frank Wilczek

I hope to write an article by this title (“What is an electron?”) someday. That’s my dream! The nature of electron is a mystery. The fact that we can build a civilization based on the manipulation of electrons without knowing … Continue reading

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Advanced LIGO is now listening to gravitational waves

Update: please see “Direct observation of gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO” for the latest information. ********************************************************************************* When binary neutron stars collapse into a black hole or when black holes collide gravitational waves emerge from the center of those collisions. Supernovas … Continue reading

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Polchinski’s review paper: Dualities of Fields and Strings

I have read Joseph Polchinski’s excellent review paper titled “Dualities of Fields and Strings“. This paper is written for experts. I am not an expert in fields and strings. I am not an expert in dualities either but I was able … Continue reading

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