Category Archives: physics

Most watched physics videos (compiled by TrueSciPhi)

TrueSciPhi is a website organized by Kelly Truelove. He describes his website as “A window on science and philosophy communities on Twitter and YouTube.” Among other things he compiles a list of the most watched physics videos. http://truesciphi.org/phyvid_sy.html The top 10 … Continue reading

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Story of how Feynman tried to get rid of fields but couldn’t

The “field” concept is a useful theoretical construct in physics. Fields can be quantized. The electromagnetic field consists of quanta known as photons. In QFT (Quantum Field Theory) the elementary particles are thought of as quanta of their respective field. … Continue reading

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2017 Oppenheimer Lecture by John Preskill on Quantum Computing

I follow John Preskill’s blog very closely. When I heard that he gave the 2017 Oppenheimer Lecture at the University of California – Berkeley I knew that this lecture would be an important educational resource. In the lecture he talks about … Continue reading

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You know, it would be sufficient to really understand the electron

 image credit: Dave Whyte “You know, it would be sufficient to really understand the electron.” – Albert Einstein as quoted by Hans G. Dehmelt in his 1989 Nobel lecture. Hans G. Dehmelt recently passed away on March 7, 2017.  His … Continue reading

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How long does it take to reach the bottom?

Under this title you expected me to say something philosophical, right? No, today’s story is more prosaic. My father was a coal mining engineer. He worked in the underground coal mines in Turkey for 25 years. When I was in … Continue reading

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Primordial qubit network perspective

If you read the recent articles [1][2][3][4] you will realize that more and more physicists are thinking of space-time and gravity as emergent phenomena. These days it is fashionable to think of the primordial fabric of the universe as a … Continue reading

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On the photon-photon interaction

image credit In my post titled “On the photon frequency” I emphasized the fact that photons do not interact with other photons, they pass through each other. Why? Because photons do not have electric charge. Some of you may have seen … Continue reading

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The Legacy of the Tevatron by S.D. Holmes and V.D. Shiltsev

In Chris Quigg’s Twitter feed I discovered this gem: The Legacy of the Tevatron in the Area of Accelerator Science by Stephen D. Holmes and Vladimir D. Shiltsev. I was a post-doctoral researcher at Fermilab between August 1988-November 1992. During … Continue reading

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A profile of Roger Penrose by Philip Ball

I have mentioned several times in this blog that Roger Penrose is one of my three heroes in physics – others being Albert Einstein and Gerard ‘t Hooft. The UK magazine Prospect published a profile of Roger Penrose. I enjoyed this … Continue reading

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Updates (February 2017)

I am going through a dry period spiritually. I cannot write inspirational (let alone inspired) pieces these days but I still want to write informative articles. In this “updates” post I wanted to mention two major developments in the world … Continue reading

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EDGE 2017 question and 206 responses by invited contributors

The EDGE 2017 question: What scientific term or concept ought to be more widely known? You can find the 206 responses by the invited contributors at the following address (the EDGE web site is a little slow, the initial load of this web … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy, physics, science, society

John Hagelin’s “Restructuring Physics” article from 1989

Latest results from the proton decay experiment at the Super-K laboratory in Japan ruled-out the simplest GUT models seeking the unification of “strong nuclear”, “weak nuclear” and electromagnetic forces at high energies. Among the proposed GUT models, the one known as the “flipped SU(5)” … Continue reading

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Qubit

Image credit Quantum Computing has entered my radar. I am a little ashamed that I ignored this subject for so long. We are entering a new era. In the forthcoming blogposts I will try to inform you about the recent technological breakthroughs … Continue reading

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Unsolved problems in physics

Image credit: “particle collisions” by Xiaoling Zeng (Quanta Magazine) Wikipedia maintains a list of unsolved problems in physics. From that list I picked the ones I consider as key questions. In the second section I remind readers about more fundamental questions … Continue reading

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Nobel Prizes for Accelerator/Beam Physics

In the field of accelerator/beam physics and technology there have been many epoch-making innovations but unfortunately only very few of those were recognized with a Nobel Prize. When I go through the list of Nobel laureates I see only these physicists … Continue reading

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A guide to Richard Gauthier’s Electron Models

Richard Gauthier’s electron models deserve a serious look. I am in the process of studying them. I asked Richard few questions and he kindly answered them. His answers were very helpful to me and it may be helpful to others as … Continue reading

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L.V. Lorenz and H.A. Lorentz

J.D. Jackson passed away on May 20, 2016. His book “Classical Electrodynamics” is a classic textbook. Like all physicists of my generation I have spent hundreds of hours studying classical electrodynamics from his book. The paper by J.D. Jackson and L.B. … Continue reading

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Edward Witten’s 2014 Kyoto Prize commemorative lecture

Edward Witten has been one of the most respected physicists in the world for the last four decades. His contributions to physics and mathematics have been recognized by many awards and prizes. Edward Witten’s Kyoto Prize commemorative lecture is an important document. The … Continue reading

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Super performance of the Large Hadron Collider in 2016

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN concluded its 2016 proton-proton run.  Integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC this year was far above the expectation. The following graphs summarize the performance numbers. For a definition of (inverse femtobarn) see this blogpost.

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Fourth type of neutrino has never been observed

Image credit There are 3 types of neutrinos. 1) electron type 2) muon type 3) tau type.  A neutrino may change its type spontaneously. As they travel, they may change from one type to another. This is one of the great … Continue reading

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Few comments on Horgan’s bunk-bashing diatribe

Image credit John Horgan is an effective communicator. He has a provocative style. His writings always succeed in creating an emotional response. His books are fun to read because they are informative and controversial at the same time. He knows … Continue reading

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Roger Penrose’s latest book: Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy

I often say that my three heroes in physics are Albert Einstein, Gerard ‘t Hooft and Roger Penrose. I try to read all books written by Roger Penrose. His latest book is titled “Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics … Continue reading

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Matthew Buckley’s particle physics tutorial articles at Boston Review

I highly recommend Matthew Buckley’s review articles at Boston Review. These are excellent tutorials. “This eight-part series maps the frontiers of contemporary particle physics. It begins with an introduction to the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the seventeen-mile-long Large Hadron … Continue reading

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Epistemic uncertainty

Image credit Definitions/origins of the terms ontic/ontological and epistemic/epistemological from Susanne Bobzien: ontic: is concerned with being (Greek ‘to on’, that which is) ontological: is concerned with the theory of being (Greek ‘logos’,among other things: theory) epistemic: is concerned with knowledge … Continue reading

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CASW Showcase interview with Natalie Wolchover

Image credit Natalie Wolchover is my favorite science journalist. I have been enjoying her articles at the Quanta Magazine. She focuses on the developments in fundamental physics. She has recently won the 2016 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, a prize given annually … Continue reading

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Can astronauts see the stars by the naked eye in space?

If you do a little research on the web you will find that the majority of the so-called experts insist that stars are visible by the naked eye in space. What bothers me is that none of those “experts” are … Continue reading

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Tanedo on the 17 MeV Anomaly in Beryllium Nuclear Decays

I have referred to Philip Tanedo* as a “rising star” in my 2015 blogpost titled “Physics Tutorials by Philip Tanedo.” In 2015 he was a post-doctoral research fellow at the UC Irvine physics department. His group at the UC Irvine (led by Jonathan … Continue reading

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A lot is happening

A lot is happening in my life, in the physics world, and in my home country Turkey. I watched in horror what happened in Turkey last month. I am very proud of my fellow Turkish countrymen. I admired their courage … Continue reading

Posted in physics, psychology, science, society

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is breaking performance records

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has reached its design luminosity: . This is a significant milestone. I congratulate everyone who was involved in the design, construction and operation of the LHC. I also congratulate everyone who work on the accelerators that feed … Continue reading

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FERMILAB History and Archives Project

All universities and national laboratories should maintain historical archives. The Fermilab History and Archives Project is exemplary. You can start with “A Brief History of Fermilab” and continue with “Significant Staff” and then explore the entire website. When I was at Fermilab between … Continue reading

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Helen Thom Edwards

Helen T. Edwards passed away on June 21, 2016 at the age of 80. She was one of the most successful and influential female physicists of the 20’th century. She dedicated her life to the advancement of accelerator and beam … Continue reading

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Counterfactual definiteness

Counterfactual (adjective) : expressing what has not happened but could, would, or might under differing conditions – British Dictionary Counterfactual (noun) : a conditional statement in which the first clause is a past tense subjunctive statement expressing something contrary to … Continue reading

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Updates (May 2016)

You can watch the status of LHC beam collisions live at the following link.https://op-webtools.web.cern.ch/vistar/vistars.php?usr=LHC3 Mark Alford’s 2015 tutorial paper in arXiv explains the concepts and terminology used in the discussions of Bell Inequality in Quantum Mechanics very clearly. In terms of clarity, … Continue reading

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Pioneers of Microvita Research (1): Richard Gauthier

After receiving a B.Sc. degree in physics from M.I.T in 1967, Richard Gauthier earned a M.Sc. degree in physics from University of Illinois in 1971. He was in the Ph.D. doctoral program at the University of Illinois for high-energy physics … Continue reading

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What is an inverse femtobarn?

Image credit “A barn (symbol b) is a unit of area. Originally used in nuclear physics for expressing the cross sectional area of nuclei and nuclear reactions, today it is also used in all fields of high-energy physics to express … Continue reading

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Live Beam Status at LHC

Happy mother’s day! LHC beams are colliding at 13 Tev (center-of-mass) energy again. The 4 LHC experiments (ATLAS, ALICE, CMS, LHCb) are collecting data. They are back in business after the long winter shut-down. You can watch the status of … Continue reading

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A short comment on Reichenbach’s Principle of Common Cause

When I came across this principle in Mark Alford’s tutorial paper on Bell Inequality I was intrigued: Reichenbach’s principle of common cause [1]: correlations can be explained in terms of causes. if two phenomena show a correlation, either one causes … Continue reading

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Sad state of physics education in Turkey

I am very sad to report that only 16 Turkish universities have physics undergraduate programs. There are currently 193 universities in Turkey. At least 50 of them had undergraduate physics programs until recently. The Council of Higher Education of Turkey (Turkish … Continue reading

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Interesting karma between Einstein and Bohr

I had a new year’s resolution never to mention Einstein in my posts again. Never say never again! I have a new resolution. I will mention his name as part of physics exposition but I will no longer comment on … Continue reading

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Direct observation of gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO

I was not going to mention Einstein in my posts anymore. But, the man stays relevant even after a century. Note to the young physicist: if you want to be remembered in the next century solve the mystery of gravitation. Newton … Continue reading

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Spin and charge forbid point-like self-couplings for all particles but the Higgs

Image credit “Indeed, self-interaction is the most basic of all processes allowed by quantum field theory, but spin and charge forbid point-like self-couplings for all particles but the Higgs.” from http://arxiv.org/pdf/1511.06495v1.pdf There is a shorter version of this statement in … Continue reading

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What does an anti-atom do in a gravitational field?

What does an antihydrogen (1 anti-proton in the nucleus and 1 positron orbiting the anti-proton) atom do in a gravitational field? Does it fall down or does it fall up? If it falls down, does the anti-hydrogen have the same … Continue reading

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Meta-theory

Image credit I have watched the film “Particle Fever” for the second time last night. There is a nice PBS article about this film. “Particle Fever” was produced by David Kaplan who is a theoretical physicist at Johns Hopkins University. … Continue reading

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Lepton universality

  Electron, muon and tau are identical except for their invariant masses. They are identical with respect to the electromagnetic force because they carry the same electrical charge (-1). They are also identical with respect to the weak nuclear force … Continue reading

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Difference between a point particle and an extended particle

Image credit Physics textbooks and educational websites still contain information saying that elementary particles are point particles. This is not entirely correct. Modern physics theories such as String Theory start with the axiom that all physical entities have spatial extension however small … Continue reading

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Why 3? (area related argument)

In the first installment I reminded the fact that there are exactly 3 generations (flavors) of fermions. This fact was established by the CERN LEP experiments (Aleph, Delphi, L3, and Opal). There is an independent confirmation of this fact by the … Continue reading

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Conceptual Design Report of the Chinese Supercollider

The first time I saw any mention of the proposed Chinese Supercollider was in an IAS webpage announcing Nima Arkani-Hamed’s efforts promoting a 100 Tev collider to be built in China. “Arkani-Hamed joined forces with Yifang Wang, Director of the Institute … Continue reading

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Mobius strip representation of spin 1/2

Physics The elementary particles known as fermions (electron, muon, tau and u, d, c, s, b, t quarks ) and their antiparticles are the constituents of matter. A fermion will impart  units of spin angular momentum when it interacts with … Continue reading

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Centennial Anniversary of Einstein’s General Relativity Theory

100 years a ago on November 25 1915 Albert Einstein presented the final version of his theory of gravitation known as the General Relativity to Prussian Academy of Sciences. The paper was published in 1916. Why do we mention David Hilbert in the … Continue reading

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Confinement mechanisms in physics theories

Image credit Why do we need confinement mechanisms in physics theories? There is a fundamental binding agent in nature, that needs to be explained. The limiting, localizing, encircling, singularity seeking confining action of the fundamental binding agent is independent of theory … Continue reading

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Gerard ‘t Hooft’s thoughts on the quantum nature of the universe

Image credit Gerard ‘t Hooft is one of my heros in physics. My other heros are Albert Einstein and Roger Penrose. Gerard ‘t Hooft  is known for his brilliance and clarity of thought. All his papers are examples of clear … Continue reading

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Why is space so big and particles so small?

Image credit You may have heard many physicists discussing this question in their public lectures: why is space so big? This question is equivalent to the other question “why are elementary particles so small?” The physical universe is unimaginably vast and it is … Continue reading

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Crazy-old-guy syndrome among theoretical physicists

Image credit When I saw this funny text in John Preskill’s blog post I smiled broadly and wanted to share it with you. “I suppose most theoretical physicists who (like me) are comfortably past the age of 60 worry about … Continue reading

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“What is an electron?” by Frank Wilczek

I hope to write an article by this title (“What is an electron?”) someday. That’s my dream! The nature of electron is a mystery. The fact that we can build a civilization based on the manipulation of electrons without knowing … Continue reading

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Advanced LIGO is now listening to gravitational waves

Update: please see “Direct observation of gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO” for the latest information. ********************************************************************************* When binary neutron stars collapse into a black hole or when black holes collide gravitational waves emerge from the center of those collisions. Supernovas … Continue reading

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Polchinski’s review paper: Dualities of Fields and Strings

I have read Joseph Polchinski’s excellent review paper titled “Dualities of Fields and Strings“. This paper is written for experts. I am not an expert in fields and strings. I am not an expert in dualities either but I was able … Continue reading

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Most cited papers in cosmology and particle physics

All time Most cited fundamental physics papers By clicking on the author’s name you see that author’s statistics in great detail. For example: Juan M. Maldacena Year-by-year The 40 most highly cited fundamental physics papers during 2015 The 40 most highly … Continue reading

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Did you know that bananas produce antimatter?

A banana releases one positron (anti-electron) every 75 minutes. Bananas contain a small amount of potassium-40, a naturally occurring isotope of potassium. Potassium-40 decays and emits a positron in the process. Positron which is antimatter annihilates on contact with matter. … Continue reading

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Another Nobel Prize For Neutrino Physics

In an earlier post titled “Recent findings of neutrino experiments (as of August 2015) ” I mentioned that neutrino physics is the future of particle physics. The findings of the neutrino experiments are probably more relevant than the findings of … Continue reading

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Large Hadron Collider Status Reports (September 23, 2015)

LHC Machine Status Report       ATLAS Status Report     CMS Status Report       LHCb Status Report     ALICE Status Report       TOTEM Status Report       LHCf Status Report     … Continue reading

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Few Metaphysical Comments on Quantum Gravity

Physicists have been trying to unify the theories of gravity and quantum phenomena in a mathematical framework but this project has proved to be extremely difficult. The SEP article on Quantum Gravity says that “Such a theory is expected to be … Continue reading

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Detailed history of Feynman Diagrams

I have been reading and thinking about the self-interaction problem of elementary particles. Feynman’s name comes up often in my readings. I may say few words about the self-interaction problem in the near future but today I wanted to bring to your … Continue reading

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Statistics for Physics PhDs conferred in the US

References https://www.aip.org/sites/default/files/statistics/graduate/graddegrees-p-08.pdf https://www.aip.org/sites/default/files/statistics/employment/phdinitemp-p-12.pdf  

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Recent findings of neutrino experiments (as of August 2015)

In each second, a trillion naturally occurring neutrinos from the sun and other bodies in the galaxy pass through our bodies but they have no effect because neutrinos rarely interact with matter. In the details explained below you will see how rare the neutrino interaction … Continue reading

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The person who organized the Solvay conferences

I have 2 posts showing the famous photo from the fifth Solvay Conference in 1927. This photograph is very dear to my heart. I am sure many other physicists feel the same way. Fifth Solvay Conference on Physics (1927) Color Photo … Continue reading

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A map of fundamental physics at the Quanta Magazine

Natalie Wolchover and Emily Fuhrman prepared an excellent summary of the current state of fundamental physics. They invite us to “explore the deepest mysteries at the frontier of fundamental physics, and the most promising ideas put forth to solve them.” … Continue reading

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Few comments on the recent Multiverse debates

Image credit I have been reading comments in the media saying that Multiverse theories are motivated by religious (theistic) view points. I don’t understand this argument. In my opinion, the opposite is true. The current version of Multiverse theories are motivated … Continue reading

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Slides from the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Morning Meetings

Accelerator physicists, engineers and technicians have daily meetings in the mornings and discuss LHC (Large Hadron Collider) status. The summary presentations are posted at the following address: https://indico.cern.ch/category/6386/ You can select the week and click on the link then you … Continue reading

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Cubic curves

The reason I am interested in cubic curves is that they may be the simplest mathematical representations of the twisting action. In “Prometheus and Chronos” I tried to build a conceptual model of particles based on the hypothesis of intrinsic … Continue reading

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Axion the particle

Image: REAPR Experiment at Fermilab In recent months and days we have started hearing more and more about the axion particle. I am interested in the axion proposal because it is the only theorized particle that turns into a photon … Continue reading

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First 13 Tev proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

My heartfelt congratulations to the physicists, engineers and technicians of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. They accelerated protons to 6.5 Tev energy while keeping them in 27 km circumference circular orbits. They also made these counter circulating protons collide … Continue reading

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Physics tutorials by Philip Tanedo

Philip Tanedo is a rising star in the world of physics and a talented communicator. I enjoyed his tutorials. I mentioned Tanedo’s excellent tutorial on the concept of chirality few times already in my posts. He is currently at the University of … Continue reading

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Proposals for space-time extensions

Our understanding of the physical universe which is a shadow of the greater Cosmos consisting of spiritual, mental and physical realms is very limited. Our scientific knowledge of the physical universe is growing at an exponential pace but we have only … Continue reading

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CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) is waking up

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is waking up after a 2 year shutdown for major upgrades. My piece “The Pause that Refreshes: CERN LHC 2-year shut-down” from 2 years ago explains that these upgrades were necessary to double the … Continue reading

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Niels Bohr’s fascination with Yin and Yang

Niels Bohr (1885-1962) was one of the greatest physicists of the 20’th century. I cannot adequately describe his contributions to physics in a short post. I recommend the Niels Bohr article at the http://www.informationphilosophers.com site. The SEP article titled “Copenhagen … Continue reading

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Fifth Solvay Conference on Physics (1927) Color Photo

Image credit Click on the image to see the bigger version First Row I. Langmuir M. Planck (1918 Nobel Laureate in Physics) Marie Curie (1903 Nobel Laureate in Physics, 1911 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry) H.A. Lorentz (1902 Nobel Laureate in Physics) A. Einstein (1921 Nobel … Continue reading

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There is a difference between knowing what is true and knowing why it is true

“There is a difference between knowing what is true and knowing why it is true” – Edward Witten I found this quotation in the “Conversation with Edward Witten.” I thank Peter Woit for bringing this document to our attention. The … Continue reading

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If there is mathematical reality then mind cannot be entirely physical

Peter Byrne from the Quanta Magazine interviewed David J. Gross* in May 2013. The title of the interview is “Waiting for the Revolution.” https://www.quantamagazine.org/20130524-waiting-for-the-revolution/ Peter Byrne’s last question in the interview was: “Is there an objective reality independent of human … Continue reading

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CERN Open Data Portal

CERN launched its Open Data Portal, which makes data from real collision events produced by LHC experiments available to the public. The official introduction says: “The CERN Open Data portal is the access point to a growing range of data … Continue reading

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English translation of Einstein’s original paper on general relativity

The English translation of Einstein’s 1915 paper on general relativity (courtesy of Princeton University Press) http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu/vol6-trans/129 Princeton University Press, working with The Einstein Papers Project hosted at Caltech, has made freely available online more than 5000 documents from Einstein’s first 44 years. … Continue reading

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English translation of Einstein’s original paper on special relativity

The English translation of Einstein’s 1905 paper on special relativity (courtesy of Princeton University Press) http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu/vol2-trans/154 Princeton University Press, working with The Einstein Papers Project hosted at Caltech, has made freely available online more than 5000 documents from Einstein’s first 44 years … Continue reading

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English translation of Einstein’s 1905 paper on photoelectric effect for which he won the Nobel Prize

The English translation of Einstein’s 1905 paper on photoelectric effect for which he won the Nobel Prize (courtesy of Princeton University Press) http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu/vol2-trans/100 Princeton University Press, working with The Einstein Papers Project hosted at Caltech, has made freely available online … Continue reading

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First Female Director of CERN

Fabiola Gianotti will be the first female director-general of CERN starting on Jan 1, 2016. This is a 5-year position. She was the leader of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from March 2009 to February 2013. … Continue reading

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Is quantum state an attribute or dimension?

I think that a quantum state is a dimension. After measurement (wavefunction collapse) the eigenvalue (the specific value obtained by the measurement) is an attribute. I have a tutorial titled “What is dimension?” but I have not written much about the … Continue reading

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Wonderful Mathematical Art of Dave Whyte

I have discovered a treasure. You can view Dave Whyte’s wonderful mathematical GIF animations at http://beesandbombs.tumblr.com/archive Dave Whyte does not provide any background information about himself but Christopher Jobson provided this information. “The Dublin-based PhD student is currently studying the physics of foam … Continue reading

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Simple, explanatory, predictive

That’s how the scientific theories should be: simple, explanatory, predictive. Paul Steinhardt expressed it in these terms in an interview with John Horgan recently. Peter Woit reported it and I wanted to report it here as well. I could not … Continue reading

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Al-Biruni

image credit I feel so ashamed for not knowing much about al-Biruni – the polymath who lived in the 11’th century. His name was brought to my attention by a newspaper article announcing the establishment of a new private university … Continue reading

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Casimir effect

Image credit In my opinion, the best conceptual explanation of the Casimir effect is given by Stephen Reucroft and John Swain in  http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-is-the-casimir-effec/ I recommend Kimball A. Milton’s paper for a scientific review. James F. Babb maintains a scientific research bibliography … Continue reading

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Are Brains Analogue or Digital?

Bartlesville High School formerly known as College High School Brain science is like particle physics. Progress in particle physics has been very slow because the experiments are very expensive and the technology is very difficult. It takes decades to design … Continue reading

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Credence

I saw the word “credence” in a blog post by Sean Carroll.  He defines credence as “degree of belief.” Here’s an interesting quote from that blog post “Quantum probabilities are really credences — statements about the best degree of belief … Continue reading

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Parity transformation changes helicity

This post is the continuation of the Parity Transformation tutorial where I demonstrated the parity transformation in 2D by using the shape of letter L. Figure (1) The image to the left of the vertical axis is the reflection of the letter … Continue reading

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Parity Transformation

In physics “parity transformation” is a special kind of reflection. Parity transformation cannot be expressed as a rotation. Do not confuse the parity transformation in physics with the parity concept in mathematics. Let be a function and the parity transformation … Continue reading

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Why does everything rotate?

All astronomical objects rotate. Earth, Moon, Sun, Milky Way, other planets, other stars,  and other galaxies all rotate. Black holes rotate too. All elementary constituents of matter (fermions) and all force carrying quanta (gauge bosons) have intrinsic spin which cannot … Continue reading

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A rotation equals two reflections

In the picture below, the red line and the blue line are the reflection lines. Image credit The A’B’C’ triangle is a reflection of the ABC triangle in the red line. Let’s call this transformation R1 The EDF triangle is … Continue reading

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Recent changes in Earth’s magnetic field

Image credit According to geologic record in the minerals, Earth’s magnetic dipole polarity reversed many times during the planet’s 4.5 billion year history. The average time between reversals is 250 thousand years.  There were no reversals in the last 780 … Continue reading

Posted in energy, geology, geophysics, mind, physics, precession of Earth, precession of equinoxes | Tagged , , , ,

Constancy of spin angular momentum irrespective of energy

Image credit Leptons (electron, muon, tau and their corresponding neutrinos and their anti-particle versions) and quarks (u, d, c, s, b, t quarks and their anti-quarks) belong to a category known as fermions. Members of this category are the constituents … Continue reading

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Fundamental Origin of the Magnetic Field

Image credit (Large Helical Device project in Japan) The Relative Truth is Objective article is one of my favorites. In that article there is a section subtitled “Why do we use the word relative?” where I use the example of electromagnetism to demonstrate … Continue reading

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On the photon frequency

Image credit We know photons exist. We also know how to manipulate photons collectively. Our technology has now advanced to the level where we can even manipulate the individual photons. But, if you ask me “what is a photon?” I … Continue reading

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Einstein did not have any PhD students

There is a great tradition in academia. If you are a successful academic you are supposed to have PhD students and guide them in their dissertation research. The more PhD students you have the better. It is a great responsibility … Continue reading

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A selection of resources on mathematics, physics and philosophy

In my previous post I mentioned the existence of a “collective mechanism” that pays attention to improvements/innovations in individual expressions. I try to do my part and bring the reader’s attention to excellent educational resources on math, physics and philosophy. I … Continue reading

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